Programs

Resilient CNY: One relationship at a time

Everyone experiences distressing events in their lives. You’ve probably heard about trauma, the emotional response to these events. Our emotional reactions can have long term effects on the way we think, make decisions, and relate to others. Resilience, our natural ability to cope with stress, helps moderate how we respond to adversity. During the 2018-2019 school year, Sanchia A Callender, Inc and our partners worked with Syracuse City School District’s Parent University to equip caregivers of school-aged children and youth, with the resources to recognize trauma driven behavior and build resilience.

The Resilient CNY Trauma-Sensitive Community project started with a recognition that Syracuse’s students and their families needed help in figuring out how to deal with the challenges they regularly experience. I asked Superintendent Jaime Alicea why he found the message about the need to address trauma compelling enough to dedicate district resources to the cause long term. He noted the loss of people, students, that couldn’t be ignored. “Syracuse is a small town,” he said as we chatted in his office in July. “Everything is connected.”

Parent participants in the project found it equally compelling. “We should all do this before we go out in the world to meet people,” reported one parent after the second week of reading Transforming the Difficult Child for book club. We sat around a table in the Sankofa room of Beauchamp Library sharing our thoughts about the week’s reading that focused on recognition, appreciation, attention, trust, and connectedness. We created the book to meet the need for year-round support for learning to build and maintain the kinds of relationships that serve as protective factors against Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and trauma.

During the year-long planning and implementation process of this project, we utilized the support of the Gifford Foundation’s What If Mini-Grant served as a booster for creating change in our community. Our organization is growing thanks to their help. We’ve added two new board members and established relationships with other community partners who share our focus on creating a vibrant community. We are continuing the work of increasing our capacity to build resilience in our community.

Persistence pays off.

Resilient CNY and Parent University Support Families and Students

Resilience film.png

Resilience: The Biology of Stress and The Science of Hope chronicles the birth of a new movement among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities, who are using cutting-edge brain science to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease.

Join us for the free screening of this film Tuesday, November 13, 2018 5:30pm at Syracuse Stage. A panel of education, health, mental health, social services, law enforcement, and community leaders will discuss the impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in their fields and what steps the Syracuse, NY community can take to address these issues.


The film screening is only the beginning. Each month during the school year, December to June, Resilient CNY is offering family engagement workshops and discussions through Syracuse City School District’s Parent University.

Why ACEs, Trauma, and Resilience? Adverse Childhood Experiences cause trauma that affects health and education. This trauma shows up as behavior in and out of the classroom. By using ACEs to identify and address sources of trauma we build resilient students and families leading to academic success.

Community Crafting Debut

Starting this November! We provide a fun relaxed environment for families living with autism and related conditions to explore their creativity together. Arts and crafts are a favorite pass time for many. We created this opportunity so families can share the fun together.

Community Crafting Collage.png

The Women’s Information Center at 601 Allen St, Syracuse, NY 13210 are our hosts every second Saturday of the month starting November 10, 2018. Join us for the debut of our Community Crafting program from to 2:00pm-4:00pm. Let us know you’re coming so we can be ready!

Volunteers who donate their time and resources make our work possible.

Donate

Program Updates

I've been busy working to develop the business plan of the foundation to help guide fundraising efforts. New program and funding initiatives are listed on the Projects page of www.sanchia.org. I'll list them here as well. I'm excited for the great things we can do for some of the most vulnerable members of our community. Please consider making a donation either  through the website or via the foundation's gofundme page.

 

Residential Youth Activities Fund

The Mohawk Hard-to-Place Unit of the Children’s Home in Schenectady, NY is the home for youth who have been in residential care for a significant part of their lives. This was Sanchia’s last work place. The Residential Youth Activities Fund will provide the funding  for onsite and community activities that give residents a fuller more rounded life experience.

 

Garrison House

Families and individuals with developmental disabilities are seeking independent living solutions for family members and themselves in increasing numbers. The service continuum after an individual reaches the age of 21, the age when school age serves end and adult services begin, is not sufficient to meet the housing needs for people with developmental disabilities. Garrison House is a hybrid program drawing on the resources of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors to create independent living solutions tailored to the needs of the individual. In doing so the program also creates housing solutions for students in related fields seeking real world experience and people in need of stable housing opportunities.

 

Autism and Mental Health Initiative

According to Data USA the clinician to patient ratio for mental health across all counties in New York state is 1 to 202. There are not enough health care providers to go around. Within that insufficient group of providers, the number who are equipped and willing to meet the needs of people with autism who also have mental health issues is smaller still. Families fight against barriers to access to find that the care that the need is only available hours away in another city or another state. The Autism and Mental Health Initiative is a coordinated effort with community partners to raise awareness of the mental health needs of people on the autism spectrum and create a movement that brings the necessary state, federal, and county resources to the Syracuse community.